Toddler suffers heat stroke during afternoon nap

The windows and blinds, not pictured here, had been closed, but there was no fan or air conditioning in the room.
The windows and blinds, not pictured here, had been closed,
but there was no fan or air conditioning in the room. (iStock)

A mother who almost lost her 3-year-old daughter to heat stroke has shared an emotional Instagram post detailing the condition to serve as a warning to others. Jennifer Abma, of Edmonton, Canada, had sent her daughter, Anastasia, for a nap in her bedroom for an hour and a half.



When she tried to wake her, Anastasia was covered in sweat and unresponsive.


“There is nothing scarier than not being able to wake your baby up,” Abma wrote in a July 14 Instagram post. “THIS is clear proof a child doesn’t need to be in the sun to get heat stroke. It took us 20 minutes to wake her up, when ambulance came, they came with investigators because they didn’t know what to expect as did I.”


Abma told Today that the temperature in the room had soared to 122 degrees. The windows and blinds had been closed, but there was no fan or air conditioning.

“Anastasia put herself for a nap, I had no idea how hot her bedroom was until I went to wake her up soaked in sweat, red face, boiling and unable to wake her for 15 minutes, ambulance arrived faster then (sic) I could’ve imagined and took her sugars where were 1.2 and should be above 4, they administered sucrose and in minutes she started crying clearly scared,” Abma wrote, in part.

“No this is not my fault this happened to her but it is hard not to blame yourself, this is a lesson learnt & hopefully other parents can take something from this & make sure you are checking the rooms in your house because thy (sic) can be as dangerous as a hot car,” she wrote.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), symptoms of heat stroke can include high body temperature, hot, red, dry or damp skin, fast, strong pulse, headache, dizziness, nausea, confusion or loss of consciousness. The agency recommends calling 911 and moving the person to a cooler place while applying cool cloths, but to avoid giving the person something to drink.

This post was first published on Fox

This may be of help to somebody, kindly help in sharing.

No comments:

Post a Comment

Disclaimer: Opinions expressed in comments are those of the comment writers alone and does not reflect or represent the views of Early Sunrise.